Majic Listen Live Banner
Majic 102.3/92.7
CLOSE
Celebrities Attend At A Party For Frankie Knuckles

Source: Al Pereira / Getty

All-star talents Beyoncé and Drake’s recent releases are reigniting an old flame for Black music. After Drake released his album Honestly, Nevermind and Beyoncé announced her return with Renaissance, releasing a new single, the two have sparked conversations around the history of house music. You guessed it: Black people are at the forefront.

Black Music Month is still going strong for the month of June. Today, we want to educate the people on the growing conversation surrounding a genre of music called House. By definition, house is a genre of electronic dance music characterized by a repetitive four-on-the-floor beat and a typical tempo of 115 to 130 beats per minute.

According to WavZine, Black musicians created house music. The publication cites that in 1977, club promoter Robert William brought DJ Frankie Knuckles to The Warehouse. House was a genre born in the sweatiest, strangest parts of an oppressed city to be raised and cared for by the minorities of the early ’80s.

While some fans found Drake’s new album comical, comparing it to the music the jellyfish danced to on SpongeBob. Other fans were stimulated in profound ways.

Fans also questioned Beyoncé’s decision to name her upcoming project Renaissance. However, this may be exactly what Black people need during these difficult times. Similar to the Renaissance our ancestors experienced time and time throughout music and culture, from the roaring ’20’s to the explosion of the ’60s, we are witnessing a noticeable shift in music. The feeling, the tempo and the rhythm are much lighter, happier and honest than ever.

New artists today aren’t reinventing the wheel of music. Instead, they are welcoming Black and Brown people back to a space of renewal. Contrary to the twerk songs and violent anthems fans have grown accustomed to over the years, this new (and old) wave of music is being recycled for the spirit.

House music is where Black people can feel at home, dancing and honoring our souls. It’s a sound that makes us dance while uplifting and motivating a community that has been oppressed for far too long. Before Beyoncé and Drake, there was Crystal Waters and Robin S. House is in us! It’s time to own the narrative.

Take the time to learn about the history of house music through a collection of songs released by Black artists throughout the years:

The Black History of House Music: How Beyoncé & Drake Are Reigniting Dance Music  was originally published on globalgrind.com

1. “Show Me Love” – Robin S.

Source:YouTube

2. “100% Pure Love” – Crystal Waters

Source:YouTube

3. “Finally” – CeCe Peniston

Source:YouTube

4. “Gypsy Woman” – Crystal Waters

Source:YouTube

5. “Strike It Up” – Black Box

Source:YouTube

6. “Pump Up The Jam” Technotronic

Source:YouTube

7. “Got A Love For You” – Jomanda

Source:YouTube

8. “Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)” – C&C Music Factory

Source:YouTube

9. “Back It Up” – Robin S.

Source:YouTube

10. “Everybody Everybody” – Black Box

Source:YouTube

11. “Caught in the Middle” – Juliet Roberts

Source:YouTube

12. “Get Up Everybody” – Byron Stingily

Source:YouTube

13. “The Bomb (These Sounds Fall Into My Mind)” – Kenny ‘Dope’ & The Bucketheads

Source:YouTube

14. “I’ll House You” – Jungle Brothers

Source:YouTube

15. “Break 4 Love” – Raze

Source:YouTube

16. Larry Levan Live at the Paradise Garage (1979)

Source:YouTube

17. “Your Love” – Frankie Knuckles

Source:YouTube

18. “The Whistle Song” – Frankie Knuckles

Source:YouTube