Black history

Howard University is taking individuals on a ride through the pages of American Legacy Magazine. The quarterly, which chronicles African-American history, will unveil an 18-wheel mobile museum of Black history. The exhibition is across from the Howard University bookstore and features photos, stories, artifacts, memorabilia and interactive learning stations that celebrate the story of Blacks […]

Where: (click below to visit venue on Foursquare) 270 E 30th Street, New York, NY 10001 When: April 1970 What: Miles Davis’ first certified gold record sold more than half a million copies, later being recognized as one of jazz’s greatest albums and a progenitor of the jazz rock genre. NEXT | PREVIOUS In celebration […]

led-zeppelin-vs-the-blues Led Zeppelin is considered by many to be one of the greatest bands in the history of rock music, but their roots clearly lie…

As a noted surgeon and scientist, Charles Drew was responsible for creating the technology to store blood for long periods of time. His lifelong concern for the necessary transport and storage of blood and plasma made him a pioneer in his field and a valued scientist in world history. Drew saved thousands of soldiers’ lives […]

If there is one person from history whose impact on the Black woman’s self-image rivals that of Oprah Winfrey, it is the hair mogul Madame C.J. Walker. Walker was the first successful Black female entrepreneur. Her insistence on involvement in both the business world and civic affairs predates Oprah’s story, and to the extent that […]

Led Zeppelin is considered by many to be one of the greatest bands in the history of rock music, but their roots clearly lie in the tradition of the blues. Their blues influences got the best of them on a few occasions during their run in the late 60s and 70s. In 1972, the band […]

In 1940, one Black novelist dared to show America what white supremacy did to one Black man. When “Native Son” appeared on America’s bookshelves, it became an instant bestseller, the first title by an African-American author selected by the Book-of-the-Month Club. It also introduced the world to the complicated protagonist of “Native Son,” Chicago’s Bigger […]

New York– A  New York Times writer today described the Apollo Theater exhibit  titled “Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing”, ironically  as an experience that “ain’t anything like the real thing”. In the Back to the Apollo, Uptown’s Showbiz Incubator article, writer Edward Rothstein points out  that while the exhibit provides interesting samples of history […]

A woman who believes “luck is preparation meeting opportunity,” Oprah Gail Winfrey has continuously shattered gender and racial barriers in America. Winfrey is the most successful talk show host in American TV history — male or female, Black or white — and the first female African-American billionaire. As one of the most influential women in […]

Ralph Ellison was the first novelist to portray the Black experience as a critical part of the American experience. His seminal novel, “Invisible Man,” was his only major work, but his letters, articles and fiction work established him as one of the most important writers in history. “Invisible Man” encapsulated the feelings of Black men […]

Mary McLeod Bethune, the daughter of slaves, became an early 20th Century educator and civil rights leader, founding both Bethune-Cookman College and the National Council of Negro Women. But Bethune became even more influential as a friend and confidant of Eleanor Roosevelt, and as an advisor to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on Negro affairs. Bethune […]

A master of storytelling, Toni Morrison was the first Black woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Pulitzer Prize winning novelist and legendary professor is known for the vivid black characters brought to life in her novels that recreate the Black experience. Morrison’s novels often illuminate themes of slavery, racism, and identity, but […]