10 Books That Inspired Tupac Shakur was originally published on theurbandaily.com

1. ‘The Art of War’ by Sun Tzu

‘The Art of War’ by Sun Tzu

Compiled more than two thousand years ago by a mysterious warrior-philosopher, ‘The Art of War’ is still perhaps the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world, as eagerly studied in Asia by modern politicians and executives as it has been by military leaders since ancient times. (Good Reads)

2. ‘The Confessions of Nat Turner’ by William Styron

‘The Confessions of Nat Turner’ by William Styron

‘The Confessions of Nat Turner’ is narrated by Nat himself as he lingers in jail through the cold autumnal days before his execution. The compelling story ranges over the span of Nat’s Life, reaching its inevitable and shattering climax that bloody day in August. (Good Reads)

3. ‘Sisterhood is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women’s Liberation Movement’ by Robin Morgan

‘Sisterhood is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women’s Liberation Movement’ by Robin Morgan

When first published in 1970, this book was a manifesto for a generation of women. Although it has not been updated since, it demonstrates how far we’ve come and what is the next step for women. Uneven style and tone of writing give this unquestionable realness not often found in more contemporary feminist anthologies. (Amazon […]

4. ‘Nostradamus: The Millennium and Beyond by Peter Lorie

‘Nostradamus: The Millennium and Beyond by Peter Lorie

Peter Lorie, in this new volume of predictions for the next two decades, has successfully provided a completely new insight into the prophet’s methods, basing them on events contemporary to Nostradamus’ lifetime. The solutions that emerge cast a completely fresh light on the predictions and give us a powerful and positive view of our near […]

5. ‘Native Son’ by Richard Wright

‘Native Son’ by Richard Wright

Right from the start, Bigger Thomas had been headed for jail. It could have been for assault or petty larceny; by chance, it was for murder and rape. Native Son tells the story of this young black man caught in a downward spiral after he kills a young white woman in a brief moment of […]

6. ‘Black Like Me’ by John Howard Griffin

‘Black Like Me’ by John Howard Griffin

In the Deep South of the 1950s, journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross the color line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. (Good Reads)

7. ‘And Still I Rise’ by Maya Angelou

‘And Still I Rise’ by Maya Angelou

In this inspiring poem, Maya Angelou celebrates the courage of the human spirit over the harshest of obstacles. An ode to the power that resides in us all to overcome the most difficult circumstances, this poem is truly an inspiration and affirmation of the faith that restores and nourishes the soul. (Good Reads)

8. ‘1984’ by George Orwell

‘1984’ by George Orwell

Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, Orwell’s narrative is more timely that ever. 1984 presents a “negative utopia,” that is at once a startling and haunting vision of the world—so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish. (Good Reads)

9. ‘Thoughts and Meditations’ by Khalil Gibran

‘Thoughts and Meditations’ by Khalil Gibran

Here is the fiery prophet, assailing the corruptions of Syrian governmental and upper social circles with the wrath and scorn of Biblical seers. (Good Reads)

10. ‘The Screenwriter’s Workbook’ by Syd Field

‘The Screenwriter’s Workbook’ by Syd Field

This is the book that allows you to participate in the processes that have made Syd Fields workshops invaluable to beginners and working professionals alike. (Good Reads)

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